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December 09, 2021  
REFLUX1 FEATURE: Prevacid
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PREVACID (lansoprazole)


What is Prevacid?
Prevacid is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) available by prescription. It can be taken as a capsule or as a powder mixed with water. It is manufactured by TAP Pharmaceuticals. Prevacid treats both immediate symptoms and damage to the esophagus caused by frequent heartburn.

How does Prevacid work?
PPIs work by deactivating the cells in the stomach that produce acid and are all indicated for healing of erosive esophagitis and maintenance of healed erosive esophagitis. Most all PPIs are indicated for indicated for symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Taking Prevacid once daily can relieve the symptoms of heartburn for 24 hours. Many people will be adequately treated with an 8-week course.

While symptoms of heartburn may disappear quickly, your doctor may want you to continue taking Prevacid, because it can help reverse some of the damage that excess acid can cause to the esophagus.

Prevacid is available in doses of 15mg or 30mg, in capsules or as a powder to mix with water, juice, or food. Prevacid should not be chewed, even when it is taken as a powder with food. Your doctor will discuss with you the appropriate dose and the form of medicine you should take. For the best effectiveness, take Prevacid at the same time each day.

Warnings and precautions when using Prevacid
Side effects are not common, but you may experience constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, or diarrhea. If you have more serious symptoms, including rash, itching, swelling, or difficulty breathing, see your doctor as soon as possible. It's possible for people with stomach cancer to experience improvement while taking Prevacid. A few people taking prevacid may experience headaches, abdominal pain, nausea, constipation, or diarrhea. Patients who are known to be allergic or sensitive to any component in the drug should not take Prevacid. Prevacid is not recommend for use in women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Prevacid may interact with other medications. Please consult your physician with any questions you may have about using Prevacid.

Who should use Prevacid?
If you get heartburn more than once a week, and diet and lifestyle changes have not been effective in alleviating the problem, talk to your doctor about Prevacid.

Prevacid is safe for children as young as one year old. However, it is not recommended that women who are pregnant or breastfeeding take Prevacid. In addition, before taking Prevacid, you should also tell your doctor about any allergies, especially to other PPIs such as Nexium or Prilosec OTC, and about any medicines or supplements you take.

Frequently asked questions about Prevacid

What if I still get heartburn?
It is safe to take antacids for acute attacks of heartburn while you are taking Prevacid.

Is Prevacid used for any other conditions?
Prevacid can be used to treat stomach and duodenal ulcers. Prevacid also comes in different forms to treat these conditions. Prevpac combines the medicine in Prevacid with an antibiotic to eliminate H. pylori bacteria, the cause of most duodenal ulcers. Prevacid NapraPAC is a combination of Prevacid and an arthritis medication. Taking painkillers, including aspirin and naproxen, as well as arthritis medications, may cause stomach ulcers. Prevacid Naprapac reduces the risk of stomach ulcers forming or returning.

   
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